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Posts Tagged ‘Programming’

Using – Ruby Version Manager (RVM)

February 22, 2011 Leave a comment

I’ve just completed a new article called “Using – Ruby Version Manager RVM” which will be another article that I’ll refresh, change and update on a regular basis.  Ruby Version Manager (RVM) is one of the best tools to use when you do Ruby Development seeing that it allows you to run multiple versions of Ruby and Gems together and to switch between these environments in an easy and straightforward way.  The idea behind RVM is to have a sand-boxed environment that does not affect your system installs and can be dumped and recreated ad-hoc without having to worry that you’ll be breaking things on your system.  By way of Gem Sets it also allows you to weave different Rubies together using different Gems.  In all it’s an extremely powerful tool and in my upcoming article where I’ll be going into the use of Bundler and how you can use this powerful Gem with RVM, you should start seeing some of the more powerful management tools at work.

I’ve found RVM to be a life saver and can’t really imagine writing code in Ruby without it.  When you start mixing in some of the other tools like Bundler, you’ll see how the power of Ruby and these tools come to life.  I hope you enjoy it and that you learn something from the article and if you have feedback on the matter or if you would like me to explore certain point in more detail, please let me know.

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GitHub – Getting Started

February 15, 2011 2 comments

Even though I’ve been away from this site for a while (bad, really bad) I am coming back to it with some ideas and hope to continue the fun.  So, for my come back, I’ve just published a “Getting Started” article under the Environments menu for getting into GitHub and I’ve also added a “Source Repository” menu item under the “About” menu that should take you to a place where I’ll hopefully be hosting some of the source of those articles that I’ve been promising for so long.  I did some research on the various online repository hosting companies and must say that the solution that GitHub gives you is very comprehensive.  So, I chose them as part of my “Ultimate Environments” range of tools I would recommend and that I will be using myself.  Take into consideration that the entire range is still under construction and I will be refining, changing and adding more information as I continue.  So, none of the articles on this site will at any stage be seen as complete, just like the code we write on a daily basis.  In the real world, we only stop coding on a project when we start with a new one and if we start with a new one, we all know that we did the previous one wrong.  I hope you like it and find it helpful and I look forward for any feedback and changes you may like.

Ultimate Environments

November 6, 2010 Leave a comment

When doing development we always underestimate the environment we work in.  What I mean by this is that we don’t want to think of how we’re going to release a product, how the testing will be done and on which platforms and we definitely don’t like to think that someone out there, usually called the “stakeholder”, would be interested to see on a daily basis the progress we’re making on the product/system they pay us to do…  Now if you take all this into consideration and you really analyze this for yourself and make a list of all those pesky things Management always make you do, which are not development related then you soon realize that they’re almost all the same things over and over and over again.  Now, if you sat down for a few seconds and really thought how you would like to remove those pesky things that they want and strictly speaking need you to do, like have a site where they can play on the product that you’re working on, or they would like to get daily (some cases even hourly) updates and they would really like to see whether the quality of the product that you’re working on is worth the money they’re spending on you and everything that comes with you, then isn’t it time that we as developers start doing something about it…  I mean there are so many resources and products out there that enable us to remove those things.  Even though these products are out there we still continue in the way we usually do…  WHY???  Could it be laziness? I don’t think so, because doing those pesky things are simply more work…  Is it that we like those pesky things?  Again I don’t think so.  Is it because we don’t have time to do it? NOPE!!! Try again…  Personally I think that it’s simply because we’re not empowered to do it and we would rather sit and play with something more cool than say setting up a Hudson server to have our nightly builds released to that “special” environment where Management and stakeholders can play.

I’ve just completed writing another article on this site where you can see how easy it is to set up an environment and will continue writing about how to continue with this process of eliminating all those pesky Management things that we, as Techies, don’t like doing and definitely don’t want to continue doing going forward… The set of articles can be found under Environments and I really hope that we start enabling ourselves to do more of these things, because I know for a fact that there are a lot of other companies out there that still don’t have these basic things in place and at the same time it’s really not a new concept…

 

Ruby and some updates

November 4, 2010 2 comments

So, I’ve been quite busy learning some new things in the last couple of weeks which is why I haven’t been blogging or writing articles.  Amongst the things that I’ve been busy with is writing some articles for Code Project which I’m hoping to publish in the next month or so.  Some of the other things I’ve been busy with is playing with Ruby and the toolkits currently available in that space.  Coming from a Java/C# background it’s been quite an experience jumping into the declarative dynamic world of Ruby and I must say that the more I play with it the more I’m starting to enjoy it.  So, my setup is something like the article that you’ll be able to find on this site here.  In the quest of learning more and more technologies and writing these articles I’ve come to appreciate the ability to slow down (in my private time) and to really think about what I’ve been doing and how all this newly found knowledge will affect my trend of thought and the way that I go forward in development and technology.  As I state somewhere on this site, it’s all about using the right tool for the right job.  Just because I’m a C# developer with a Java background doesn’t mean that those are always the right tools to get things done.  Yes you may be able to do anything in your chosen technology, but does that allow you to really understand the problem you’re trying to solve or does it really make the Technology you use and the constraints it introduces your main focal point.  As I’ve learned, the more you know, the less constrained you are by what you don’t know…  Maybe ignorance is bliss and we should simply continue in the way that we always have, but then where’s the fun in that right?  🙂

MongoDB — Location Based Sharding, Global View of data

September 27, 2010 Leave a comment

Map-of-complexity-science

Image via Wikipedia

So, in my previous blog I raised a question as follows:

“How do you save your data to the closest data center while still having a global view i.e international customers should have a view of their data no matter where they or their data are and without affecting performance?”

What I should also have noted was that I’ve written the very complex routing code as I’m sure so many out there have as well.  So, why would I raise the question if I’ve done this kind of thing before…  Well, there may just be another solution (simpler solution) out there that doesn’t involve this complexity that we as developers like to create for ourselves.  Now, over the last couple of weeks I’ve been doing some research on MongoDB and have come to like the simplicity that they bring across in their product.  Which is why I’m busy writing all the articles under the MongoDB menu on this blog.  It’s very much a work in progress, so don’t expect much at this stage, but the idea is that as time goes past I’ll have a complete set of articles with code running under all kinds of circumstances as well as in different languages…

Why am I blogging about some articles that will be coming up?  Simple…  I do it because I see it as a promise to myself that I must do something and that no matter what, I’ve made the commitment to myself…

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